Replacing the Lords could trigger more UK crises

Replacing the Lords could trigger more UK crises
More than 700 peers have the right to sit in the House of Lords. (Image: UK Parliament)
Bloomberg
By Adrian Wooldridge The House of Lords has survived several near-death experiences in its long history. In 1649, the Cromwellian regime abolished the Lords, on the grounds that it was “useless and dangerous to the people of England”. It re-emerged in 1660 when the monarchy was restored. In 1911, the Liberal government planned to replace the Lords with a chamber “constituted on a popular instead of a hereditary basis”. But those reforms fizzled. In 1997, Britain elected a Labour party that had traditi...

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